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Science for Children

Science magazines for children, that helps you discover the known, the unknown, as well as little known facts. Discover the how and why of everyday things and explore the rare and exotic living species . Facts, features, learning and fun for kids.

Science for Children ❯❯ 5 Ws & H | Living World for Kids | Planet Earth for Kids | Science News for Kids | Technology for Kids |

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Why do Clocks Run Clockwise?

Why do Clocks Run Clockwise?

“Time to get dressed!” cries a harried Mama as she tries to pack the bag, straighten the tie, pack lunch, tie shoelaces as at the same time she pushes children dragging their heels towards the bus stop. Oh? Is it already “Time for school?” later still its “time for dinner” or “time for bed!” Old Father Time can be quite an interfering busybody and there really is nothing we can do. Most of us spend a greater part of our time and lives trying to beat exactly this – time! Strangely enough the clock’s needles seem to take forever to inch forward during a dull lesson, while time really flies when we are having a good time! All of us are time conscious. We surround ourselves with alarm clocks, cuckoo clocks, wristwatches, grandfather clocks and peering at them to make sure we are sticking to our schedule. But have you ever taken a moment to wonder why the needles on the face of a clock move the way they...

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How does a Nuclear Bomb differ from a Conventional Bomb?

How does a Nuclear Bomb differ from a Conventional Bomb?

Every now and then we hear of countries of the world carrying out heated discussions about nuclear bombs. The topics range from who has the right to own a nuclear bomb and who does not, who should use it and who must not and so on. But what exactly happens when such a bomb actually explodes? And how are nuclear bombs different from conventional bombs? The greatest difference between the two types of bombs is the sheer scale of destruction they cause. While a conventional bomb can be targetted to damage a particular area and the people living there, nuclear bombs are weapons of mass destruction. Just consider this: a 1 megaton (million ton) nuclear bomb is enough to wipe out the largest city on Earth. (1 ton=1000 kilograms) Conventional Bomb versus Nuclear Bomb A conventional bomb releases most of its energy in the form of blast. Atomic bombs on the other hand, release 50 per cent energy as blast, 35 per cent as heat and 15 per cent...

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Why don’t Birds on a wire get a shock?

Why don’t Birds on a wire get a shock?

Now how is that possible? The fact is, for a living creature to get a ‘shock’ there has to be a substantial flow of current through the body. However, there is barely any current running through the bird’s body for two reasons. Firstly, the bird not only forms a circuit with the wire, but it also offers a high resistance to current, so the current passes through the wire instead of the bird. It’s a bit like this, would you prefer going on a smooth road or a road full of potholes? The answer is obvious and just like you, the current prefers taking the easier path. All objects offer some amount of resistance to the flow of current, depending on the material. This is just one of the reasons why birds don’t get shock, however the more important reason why current does not pass through the bird is, there is barely any, if at all, voltage difference across the bird. Current flow is actually just the flow of...

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Posted by in Living World for Kids

Is Tomato a Vegetable or a Fruit?

Is Tomato a Vegetable or a Fruit?

We think the tomato is a vegetable, but it is actually a fruit. Because it is not sweet and is used for providing flavour to food, we think of it as a vegetable. The tomato is originally from Mexico. The word “tomato” comes from the Spanish tomate, which in turn comes from the Nahuatl word tomatotl. Spanish explorers who went to South America about 500 years ago, brought back the tomato to Europe. The French called them love apples, while the British called them apples of gold. Young men made necklaces of tomato seeds and presented them to their loved ones. The first people in Europe to eat tomatoes were Italians. As far back as 500 years ago, the joys of eating fried tomato with salt and pepper, was known to them. They discovered that tomato made a very good companion to pasta and cheese dishes. In other countries like England, tomatoes were thought to have poison in them. That is because tomatoes were related to poisonous plants called...

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Posted by in 5 Ws & H, Living World for Kids

How Wool Came Into Existence

How Wool Came Into Existence

It must have been a very intelligent human who looked at a sheep walking past and thought of the use its fleece might have! Although the oldest surviving textile made out of wool is around 3,500 years old, the oldest fine woolen fabric dates to the fifth century BC (about 2,500 years ago) and was found in an ancient Greek colony. Wool was probably the first fiber to be woven into a textile. Because when primitive man stopped hunting and started herding animals, it was his first step from a primitive life to a civilised one. Sheep were sort of a stone age convenience store for the nomadic lifestyle of our primitive ancestors, a walking food supply that required little care. Sheep provided for all the basic needs – meat and milk for food, skin and bones for clothing, shelter and tools. The loose wool was less essential, but as the animals shed their coats each spring, tufts of fleece were gathered and used to soften some of life’s...

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Posted by in 5 Ws & H, Technology for Kids

What is Artificial Intelligence?

What is Artificial Intelligence?

If you touch a hot metal object, you will yank your hand away immediately. When this happens to you the first time, the sequence of events and the result (the burning of your hand) gets stored in your brain. This is what we call an experience. When you see a hot metal object next time, you will not touch it. You will use the knowledge of your previous experience and decide to not repeat it again. This process of learning, comparing a previous experience, making a decision and acting upon it is the key to human intelligence. We can make more and more complicated decisions by learning from our past experiences. Ever since machines were invented, scientists have dreamt of making them learn and perform intelligent tasks – like humans. Artificial intelligence is a branch of science which is into making machines think like humans. These machines, or computers, can store large amounts of information and process them accurately and at an amazing speed. What they lack is an...

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Who Invented The Pen?

Who Invented The Pen?

The history of writing instruments with which humans have recorded and conveyed thoughts, feelings and grocery lists, is the history of civilisation itself. This is how we know about our ancestors and their lives. The handy sharpened-stone, used for skinning and killing animals was adapted into the first writing instrument. Around 24,000 BC, the cave man started drawing pictures with the stone onto the walls of his cave dwelling. His drawings showed events in daily life such as the planting of crops or hunting victories. Walls at the Apollo site in Namibia, southwest Africa are believed to be the oldest rock paintings to date. Before paper came along, people used clay or wax tablets on which they wrote using sharp objects such as metal sticks or bones. Around 6000 years ago, in 4000 BC, the Egyptians invented the first substance like paper called papyrus. It was a woven mat of reeds, pounded together into a hard, thin sheet. The word ‘paper’ actually comes from the word ‘papyrus’. Ancient Greeks...

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Why does the Sun follow You?

Why does the Sun follow You?

Have you ever noticed that when you are in a car, or a bus, travelling on a straight road, the Sun appears to move right along with you? While telephone poles and trees close to the road, whiz past in the blink of an eye, the Sun is always visible throughout the journey. No matter how fast Daddy drives, you just cannot leave the Sun behind. Strangely enough, the trees nearer the road disappear from your range of vision more quickly than the trees further off. Why is this so? Our eyes have a certain ‘range’ of vision. You can see things only within that range. For instance, you cannot see objects behind your head. This field of vision widens out from the point where you are. Objects further away are visible for a longer period, even as your car whizzes by. Field of vision To understand what the range of vision is, draw a triangle as in the picture and name the corners A, B and C, such...

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